Vegan Curry

This delicious curry is SUPER quick to make and it’s also raw! Which means it’s perfect for these hot running conditions, while also being really tasty…

Ingredients

2 avocados, 2 lemons, juiced, 2 tbsp sesame oil, 2 tbsp curry powder, 4 carrots, 1 apple, 3oz green beans, 1 red onion, 2 stalks celery, 1 red pepper, 2oz pine nuts, 1oz raisins.

Method

Blend avocado, lemon, sesame oil and curry to a cream in a food processor. Meanwhile, grate carrot and apple, fine slice green beans, onion, celery and red pepper. Add remaining ingredients, stir and serve.

Spiced Almond Dessert Salad

A delicious post-run sweet snack, packed with protein for muscular recovery – plus it’s good for your joints too

 

Ingredients

olive oil spray

50g whole natural almonds

1 cloves fresh garlic, crushed

1/2 finely chopped red chilli

1 tsp sea salt

4 finely chopped tomatoes

1 tbs chopped coriander stem

1/4 cantaloupe melon

1 tbs blueberries

1 tbs fresh mint

Method:

1. Toss the almonds in oil and cook over gentle heat for 4 mins, tossing them around regularly. Add the chilli, salt and garlic and cook for a further 2- 4 minutes or until the garlic turns into a golden colour.

2. Remove from the heat and stir in the coriander and tomatoes

3.  Toss the melon, fruit and fresh mint together and serve with salad leaves. Delicious with a spoonful of natural yoghurt.

GRTW Recipes for Foodie Runners: Power Bombs

So, you hate gels or want to avoid them while training? Try our all natural energy balls

 

  • Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 15 medjool dates, pitted and roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup shredded unsweetened coconut (plus 1/4 cup for rolling)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cacao powder
  • pinch of rock salt
  • 1 tablespoon water if needed

Method

Put almonds into a food processor and pulse until it forms a flour (or you can use packet almond flour). Now add the remaining mixture and pulse until combined. If it seems dry, add a bit more coconut. Then spoon out the mixture and roll into balls. Coat each ball by rolling in coconut.

These are great for afternoon snacks, pre and post run and every time in between. You can also play around with the ingredients, changing the nut (pecan and walnut?) and add cinnamon, ginger, even a bit of cracked black pepper.

If you’re lucky enough to run with us in Brighton, some of our runners even get these at the end of a run.

GRTW Recipes for Foodie Runners: Ricotta Pancakes

We don’t know about you, but we often fantasise about what we’re going to enjoy eating during a long run. And so after we tried a version of these at Ott0lenghi one weekend, we had to give them a go ourselves. They’re delicious, and make for a perfect post run brunch at the weekend…

Ingredients 

1 cup ricotta cheese

1 cup plain flour*

1/2 tsp baking powder

1  tbsp caster sugar

3/4 cup of milk or non-diary substitute

2 large eggs, separated

2 tsp cinnamon

Butter for cooking

*for an added protein kick, replace the flour with almond flour although it will make for a denser, less fluffy pancake.

Method

Combine, flour, baking powder, sugar and cinnamon. In a separate bowl, whisk ricotta, milk and the yolks of the eggs.  Combine with the dry ingredients and add the egg until it forms a smooth mixture. It should be a thick batter so if need be, add more milk. Meanwhile, beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks. Gently fold into the mixture.

In a hot buttered grill pan, drop two ladles of the mixture into a hot pan. Turn the heat down and wait until you begin to see the edges brown and little bubbles appear on the surface. Now flip over. Cook until golden both sides, put to one side in a heated oven until all the mixture is done.

Serve with fruit salad, Greek yoghurt and a drizzle of maple syrup. Sit down, devour!

The best thing about these pancakes is, if you make too many, you can keep them and eat them the next day as snacks.

 

 

 

 

GRTW Recipes for Foodie Runners: Grilled peaches with mint, honey and roasted hazelnuts

The season is on the turn and with it comes lots of delicious fruit which can make for some great, quick healthy desserts…

Ingredients

Peach or nectarine, halved

Small handful of hazelnuts

Fresh mint

Honey

Squeeze of fresh orange and lime

Method

Add a teaspoon of honey to a saucepan with a tablespoon of water. Warm through to help dilute the honey (some of the water should burn off) then add the orange juice and lime. Taste and adjust if it’s not sweet enough. Reserve the liquid.

Put the nuts on a roasting tray or a clean pan and toast for a few minutes until nice browned. Keep to one side.

Brush the peach halves with the honey liquor and then place flat side down on a hot clean griddle pan. It should only take a few minutes to chargrill. Serve immediately with the rest of the honey juice, hazelnuts and some chopped mint. Goes really well with Greek Yoghurt.

 

 

Marathon Mastery Series: Secrets from the Frontline

So, this weekend is the big one, the London Marathon. We asked for the top tips from the pacers to the sports photographers to help you to have your best marathon ever…

The Race Marker

Ever wondered why you can run the same race as a friend but they have run a shorter distance? It could all be due to the magic line. At the Virgin London Marathon, you will notice a line marked on the road which shows the exact 26.2 mile distance. Stick to this for the most direct route. But be aware, a lot of runners try to do the same so it can make for a busy line!

Portable loo provider 

No matter how many times you go to the toilet before a race, you always feel you need to go again just before the race when there’s a big line. The trip to skipping the queue? Get running.

‘If you are uncertain whether you really need to go, wait,’ advises Abi Sweetman, www.loosfordos.com, who supplies portable toilets for events including the Virgin London Marathon. ‘Most big races have toilets on the course, there won’t be a queue and they’ll be cleaner.’ Study the route map for toilet locations and making a mental note before the race. ‘They are often just before or after a water station, so it’s a natural place to slow or stop anyway.’

 

The Pacer

‘If you want to follow a pacer, begin at the start line,’ explains ultra-marathoner, Susie Chan, www.susie-chan.com who has paced at the Virgin London Marathon three times. ‘If you join a group later, their pace will be different as they may have started before or after you.’ Be particularly wary in London, which has multiple starts and different pacers for each start which will be denoted by a flag of the same colour as the colour of your start area.

The Physiotherapist

It’s every runner’s biggest worry, getting injured on race day. The best way to overcome this is to  see a physiotherapist before the race if you have a niggle so that you can prepare and make an informed decision about what you’re going to if it flares up. ‘If you have ITBS, a common runner’s knee injury or instance, running will hurt but it won’t damage your knee and so you can decide if you want to push through it on race day,’ says Dawn Buoys, founder of www.bodyrehabstudios.com. ‘If it’s something more complex, make a plan in your head before the race about where you’re going to stop enroute if it flares up. This will help you feel less anxious and enable you to focus on enjoying the race.’

The Race photographer

‘Marathon photographers use telephoto lenses so you need to be ten metres away and in direct eye line contact to give them the chance of getting the best shot,’ explains Bob James, www.bobjames.com official commercial photographer for the Virgin London Marathon.

If your friends are on the route, arrange a hand signal.

‘If you arrange a sign that you’re going to make at a certain landmark, friends or family can look out for this and be ready to get you for a perfect personal race day photo as you pass.’

The Race Finish Organiser

When all your focus is on getting to the start line and running 26.2 miles, organising the end is often neglected.

‘Finishing a marathon can be a disorientating experience,’ explains Andrew Smith, who has worked as the Finish Director at the London Marathon for the last 14 years. ‘I always recommend you print out where you have arranged to meet friends and family and put it in your race bag because it’s easy to get confused or forget when you’re tired.’

As for the London marathon itself, the finish funnel is half a mile long and  ‘At London we have meeting areas signposted with letters of the alphabet for your surname, but if you walk to XYZ, it will be less busy.’  

 

 

(this is an abbreviated version of an article that GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston wrote for Women’s Running magazine. click here for the full article)

GRTW Recipes for Runners: Roasted Butternut Squad and Halloumi Salad with Coconut, Coriander & Chilli Pesto

This is one of those recipes that sounds like a total hassle and like it will take a ton of time. But it’s really quite easy as most of it can be shoved in the oven to roast away and the pesto itself takes minutes if you have a food processor. The pesto is the queen of this dish, it’s amaaaazing and you can use it with anything from fish to roast chicken so it makes a brilliant post-run meal which sorts out your protein recovery fix as well as being damn tasty.

 

Ingredients

For the pesto

  • 75 g coriander (leaves and stalks)
  • 75g of fresh mint
  • 50 g unsalted roasted cashews
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 long red chilli, roughly chopped (deseeded if you don’t like it too hot)
  • 0.5 lime (juice and finely grated zest)
  • half tin of coconut milk
  • 1 pinch flaked sea salt

 

  • Cup of cooked couscous
  • Butternut squash, cut into pieces, and roasted in the oven with olive oil, salt and pepper
  • Vine tomatoes,  roasted
  • Asparagus, gently steamed
  • Block of halloumi – cut  into thin slices and dry fry in an un-greased pan, turn when browned

For the pesto, add the chilli, garlic and cashews to the food processor and whizz up. It doesn’t need to be smooth, a little bit of chunkiness from the nuts can be nice. Now add the herbs, and salt and whizz again. Lastly, add enough coconut to combine but for it to keep it’s texture without becoming runny. Taste for seasoning and add fresh lime juice, and more chilli to taste. Serve with the salad.

 

GRTW Recipes for Foodie Runners: Cauliflower & black kale coconut curry

Packed with protein this is a satisfying and nutritious dish fcontaining coconut milk which contains vitamins C, E, B1, B3, B5 and B6 and minerals including iron, selenium and sodium, perfect for a post run recovery meal…

Haven’t got all the vegetables you need? Mix and match with what you have in your fridge.

Serves 4

4cm ginger, peeled and chopped

4 garlic cloves

1 fresh green chilli, roughly chopped, seeds removed if you prefer less heat

Salt

Olive oil

2 large red onions, chopped

1 tbsp of tomato puree

1 1/2 tsp of ground coriander

1 1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/2 tsp chilli powder

1 cauliflower broken into florets

400ml coconut milk

100g cashew nuts

Two handfuls of black kale, roughly chopped

1/2 tsp garam masala

Fresh coriander, roughly chopped

Fresh lemon

Place the ginger, garlic and chilli into a food processor with the salt and whizz up. Add a little oil to help it become a paste.  Place to one side.

Fry the onions until just turning brown, add the paste and fry for 3 minutes. Next add the tomato puree, all the spices except garam masala and stir to mix.

Add the cauliflower and coat with spices, add the coconut milk and bring to the boil. Turn to simmer, put a lid on and leave to cook.

Meanwhile, heat 1 tbsp of oil in a pan and fly the cashews until golden.

Finally add to the cauliflower along with kale. Sweat down and then add the garam masala. Adjust seasoning and add the coriander and a big squeeze of fresh lemon before serving. You may add water to thin the sauce out.

 

Adapted from Made in India, by Meera Sodha, Penguin

GRTW Food for Foodie Runners: Spicy Cambodian Inspired Salad

Packed with flavour and spice to fight inflammation and help you recover

 

This recipe is inspired by the food that I ate while in Cambodia where I was writing about taking part in the Angkor Wat Half Marathon (watch out for our upcoming December 2019 trip) for Run ABC magazine. It’s packed with mint, chilli and all important fresh turmeric which is used in so much of Cambodian food and is particularly renowned for it’s anti-inflammatory properties helping you to recovery quickly – while enjoying LUSH food.

 

Ingredients

(Serves two)

Fresh turmeric root (available from most Asian supermarkets or health food stores)

1-2 Birds Eye red chillies

Fresh mint and coriander

Kaffir lime leaves (again you can get these frozen in Asian supermarkets)

2 Fresh Limes

Palm Sugar

Thai fish sauce

Rice wine vinegar

Little Gem lettuce, chopped

2 carrots

3 large tomatoes, diced

2 peppers, diced

Dry roasted peanuts

Method

In a pestle and mortar, grind together the chopped up chillies (you may not need two, that’s just me!) with grated turmeric root (1 inch piece is great) and then add fish sauce and rice wine vinegar. Now add palm sugar to taste, along with lime juice. (You’ll have to adjust the seasoning to how you like it but it’s meant to be spicy, sweet and sour – rice wine vinegar will sweeten and the palm sugar helps to take out the fire!).

Now add the peppers, carrot, and chopped tomatoes, and lightly pound with kaffir lime leaves with the dressing. Finally add it to the lettuce and combine well, with plenty of fresh herbs and sprinkle with dry roasted peanuts. You can serve this with pan roasted salmon, a sliced beer, chicken or tofu, whatever takes your fancy.

So, this is not quite as good as Cambodian food eaten on the side of the road at a street food stall (I’ll never forget fish baked in salt crust with a banana leaf salad at a street stall!)  but it’s pretty good!