Project 26.2 – who will win our marathon training package?

In November, we launched #project26.2, which is going to provide four lucky women with the chance to win virtual marathon training and mentorship with GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston and head Brighton coach Tara Shanahan. Between them, they’ve run around 15 marathons and have seen their times drop to just under 3 hours 16 minute. 

We thought we’d share some of the entries out of the hundreds that we’ve received so far. There’s still time for YOU to apply yourself though. Entries close 17th December. To read about the terms and conditions and to enter, click here

 

 

Mona Sorenson, mum of two

Mona, is an experienced runner but with two young children, finds it hard to devote the time or headspace to achieving what she would like in marathon running.

Being a busy working mum especially means I don’t really have the luxury of time needed to really coach myself or take myself to the next level.’

 

For Rachel, it will be her first time running a marathon; ‘A marathon is my ultimate running goal and my best chance of achieving it is by committing to working with a coach to train for it. I’ve only been running regularly for three years, but if I were to win this competition I would learn what I am capable of.’

Judith: I’ve got a charity place to run London for MyelomaUK, a charity close to my heart as I have Myeloma and AL Amyloidosis.

I’m in remission at the moment. I’ve been building up my running over the past year and completed a trail marathon in the summer. Running on roads isn’t my thing so I’ll need a lot of support and advice to help me complete London in a time and way that will make all my sponsors proud.’

 

The hardest thing about running a marathon is not the race, but navigating the training and that’s where we step in with our silver and gold service packages. We write your plans personalised to YOU, taking into consideration not just your running background but what’s going on in your life too. After all, what’s the point of following a 70 mile per week training plan when you’re juggling work, family and relationships? Running should reward and challenge, not punish and add to your stress levels.

 

 

Launching #grtwproject26.2

Have you got a Spring marathon lined up next year? Read on to find out how to you could WIN our silver service training package worth £480 for  as part of #grtwproject26.2 2019…

With our training service, it will feel like you’ve got someone running and guiding you at all times

 

Signing up for a marathon is exciting, whether it’s your first or your fiftieth time of running 26.2 miles. But juggling training, family, relationship, work and lifestyle commitments can derail even the most enthusiastic and committed runner amongst us.

Which is why we have created our one to one virtual silver coaching package, which provides you with personalised training plans written for YOU by one of our team of qualified and experienced running, yoga and strength and conditioning coaches, including GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston and head coach, Tara Shanahan. Plus, god forbid anything goes wrong, co-founder and qualified physiotherapist will provide the support to help you get back to training.

We write a plan that fits YOUR lifestyle, your goals and your running background and experience.

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced runner who would like to achieve a personal best, we’ll deliver your training via our software partners, Training Peaks, one of the world’s best training software packages,  with your progress reviewed weekly and a monthly coaching call via Skype, telephone or email.

Training plans and workouts delivered direct to your phone with email reminders

We don’t just help you with your running, but your mental approach, nutrition, stretching, strength and more, enabling you to train without the stress and anxiety of being unsure of what you’re doing or how you can fit it in. Plus, if something goes wrong – illness, injury or a holiday and your training is derailed, our plans change to accommodate this and get you back on track.

So, no stress, no injury causing you to crash out of your A race, and progress that you can measure and see to help you build your confidence day by day, ready for race day.

To launch our silver service, we are now offering FOUR women the chance to win our mentoring service taking you from January right the way through to your Spring marathon race day.

In order to be in with a chance of winning our special #grtwproject26.2 2019, worth £480, enter below and like our Facebook or Instagram channel, where we will be sharing stories of our entrants and inviting votes from our community. ENTRIES CLOSE 17TH DECEMBER 2018.

 

 

ENTER #GRTWPROJECT26.2 HERE

 

 

Terms and Conditions 

  • Only open to women 18 or over
  • You will need write a short weekly post for our blog, detailing your training to help inspire and motivate others – even when training is NOT going right
  • You can be any level, beginner or experienced
  • If you are currently injured and unlikely to be able to start training in December, please do not enter
  • The judges decision about the winners is final
  • Training will start in January
  • You must be able to commit to doing a minimum of four training runs per week
  • You will need to have a Garmin training watch
  • Training Peaks Premium account is not included

 

 

 

Marathon Mastery Series: Secrets from the Frontline

So, this weekend is the big one, the London Marathon. We asked for the top tips from the pacers to the sports photographers to help you to have your best marathon ever…

The Race Marker

Ever wondered why you can run the same race as a friend but they have run a shorter distance? It could all be due to the magic line. At the Virgin London Marathon, you will notice a line marked on the road which shows the exact 26.2 mile distance. Stick to this for the most direct route. But be aware, a lot of runners try to do the same so it can make for a busy line!

Portable loo provider 

No matter how many times you go to the toilet before a race, you always feel you need to go again just before the race when there’s a big line. The trip to skipping the queue? Get running.

‘If you are uncertain whether you really need to go, wait,’ advises Abi Sweetman, www.loosfordos.com, who supplies portable toilets for events including the Virgin London Marathon. ‘Most big races have toilets on the course, there won’t be a queue and they’ll be cleaner.’ Study the route map for toilet locations and making a mental note before the race. ‘They are often just before or after a water station, so it’s a natural place to slow or stop anyway.’

 

The Pacer

‘If you want to follow a pacer, begin at the start line,’ explains ultra-marathoner, Susie Chan, www.susie-chan.com who has paced at the Virgin London Marathon three times. ‘If you join a group later, their pace will be different as they may have started before or after you.’ Be particularly wary in London, which has multiple starts and different pacers for each start which will be denoted by a flag of the same colour as the colour of your start area.

The Physiotherapist

It’s every runner’s biggest worry, getting injured on race day. The best way to overcome this is to  see a physiotherapist before the race if you have a niggle so that you can prepare and make an informed decision about what you’re going to if it flares up. ‘If you have ITBS, a common runner’s knee injury or instance, running will hurt but it won’t damage your knee and so you can decide if you want to push through it on race day,’ says Dawn Buoys, founder of www.bodyrehabstudios.com. ‘If it’s something more complex, make a plan in your head before the race about where you’re going to stop enroute if it flares up. This will help you feel less anxious and enable you to focus on enjoying the race.’

The Race photographer

‘Marathon photographers use telephoto lenses so you need to be ten metres away and in direct eye line contact to give them the chance of getting the best shot,’ explains Bob James, www.bobjames.com official commercial photographer for the Virgin London Marathon.

If your friends are on the route, arrange a hand signal.

‘If you arrange a sign that you’re going to make at a certain landmark, friends or family can look out for this and be ready to get you for a perfect personal race day photo as you pass.’

The Race Finish Organiser

When all your focus is on getting to the start line and running 26.2 miles, organising the end is often neglected.

‘Finishing a marathon can be a disorientating experience,’ explains Andrew Smith, who has worked as the Finish Director at the London Marathon for the last 14 years. ‘I always recommend you print out where you have arranged to meet friends and family and put it in your race bag because it’s easy to get confused or forget when you’re tired.’

As for the London marathon itself, the finish funnel is half a mile long and  ‘At London we have meeting areas signposted with letters of the alphabet for your surname, but if you walk to XYZ, it will be less busy.’  

 

 

(this is an abbreviated version of an article that GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston wrote for Women’s Running magazine. click here for the full article)

How was your weekend running?

This weekend saw the second up in the weekend series of marathons with the Brighton marathon taking part in the HQ city of Girls Run the World. Were you there?

 

This weekend is a big one in the Brighton running calendar because of the Brighton Marathon. It’s now in it’s ninth year (expect something special next year for the 10th anniversary) and it has grown in popularity year on year, partly due to it’s proximity to London and the fact that it’s a draw for those who don’t get a London place.

Add to that the fact that there is also a 10km race at the same time, along with the Kid’s Mini Mile races the day before, and the entire city turns into a running metropolis for the weekend.

We had lots of runners taking part this weekend, as well as a few of our mentoring clients (well done Verona and Kellie!) and so we were out in force cheering and supporting. (Sorry if we didn’t spot you, it’s hard if we’ve not met personally – although I’m sure I saw Vix In Lewes from Instagram!)

Well done to every single one of you who ran the 10km or the marathon, but particularly to all the first time marathon runners. You learn a lot about yourself and your running when you do 26.2 miles for the first time (er, and the second, fifth and tenth time!) You may not realise those lessons the afternoon of the race or even the next day, but over the next week, things about your race will begin to sink in, what you executed brilliantly, what you realise in hindsight that you would do differently next time. (If, of course there is a next time).

If these lessons do filter through, don’t waste them. Write them down. Because after a week has passed, you’re likely to forget them and you don’t want your race day experience to go to waste.

One of the biggest lessons I have learned from doing marathons (I think my next one will be 10th or 11th) is that the race really doesn’t start until the last 10km. That’s when you need to dig deep and really focus mentally. Of course a marathon is tiring physically, but mentally, it’s exhausting!

But as so many of the runners out there showed today in the final stages, a smile goes a long way of lifting your spirits.

Well done to you ALL and particular kudos to our first timers out there today, Verona, Vanessa, Demi, Ellie and Verona, and to all the many 10km runners who took part too.

Of course, there was another big marathon taking place today too…Boston! Did any of you run? One more biggie go to next weekend …VLM!!

Whatever distance or wherever you ran this weekend, we’d love to hear about it. AND If you ran a marathon today, what is the single best piece of advice you would give to any runner who is about to take on London next weekend? Comment below.

 

Marathon Mastery Series: Race Day Tips

This week, we chatted with GB Endurance Coach, Tom Craggs about tips for marathon race day….

Keep your nerves in check

As you’re eating your pre-race breakfast or walking to your starting pen or think about five to ten key positive statements to help you keep calm. It doesn’t matter what your training was like, there is alway something that you did well in the 16-20 weeks, whether it was a good core exercise or hill session. Focus on that.

Let everyone run away from you

The first 10km will feel REALLY easy. Stick to YOUR race. Let everyone run away from you. Then, they become targets for you later in the race. Just because it feels easy, this is  NOT a reason to go fast. If you’re really gutsy, run the first 10km slower than your race pace.

GRTW add; – sticking to your pace is CRUCIAL. Running faster doesn’t mean you’ve ‘got miles in the bag’ as we’ve heard so many women say when they first start racing. It means you’ll find it much harder at the end. Be disciplined.

Don’t allow the crowds to push you past your pace

Through Cutty Sark, there will be so much noise and the atmosphere is so amazing, you’ll be pyschologically pushed out of  Greenwich and  then you’ll hear Tower Bridge about a mile away. And suddenly, you’ll find you’re running the second 10km faster than you should. Enjoy the crowds but HOLD back.

GRTW note: Likewise if you’re running Brighton marathon and it’s your home town and you know so many people who are out there to cheer you on, watch you don’t start running faster when you go past them. AT the latter stages of the race (final two miles) it can be helpful but NOT when you’re only mid or even three quarters of the way through. 

It’s going to get tough

At some point in a marathon, it’s going to start feel tough, that’s why you’re doing it. The so called wall? No one builds a wall at mile 20. It’s created by you going too fast at the beginning and not fuelling properly or your head.

GRTW note: Accept that the marathon is a huge battle. You don’t escape the fight, no matter how fit you are. No one escapes the mental struggle that you will face. How we do differ as runners is how we decide to handle that struggle.

You have a choice

You will come to a point on a race day where you have a choice to keep going, to keep pushing, or to slow down. Tests show that the key limiter in endurance is not our body and our muscles, it’s our minds. You need to build your mental strategies and that you’re going to go to when you get to that stage. I use runners 20 to 30 metres in front and work on overtaking them. This helps  you to apply your focus away from the pain that you will be feeling.

 

You CAN do this

Every single one of you can get to the end of 26.2 miles.  If someone you love needed your help and they were 26.2 miles away, you could make it.

 

 

Marathon Mastery Series: The Taper

Are you having the terror tapers? Join the other millions of women who are more than likely feeling exactly the same. Here’s how to handle the marathon taper and figure out what is worth being disciplined about and what you should put down to complete maranoia…

How to get to the end of the rainbow of your taper period

I feel so lardy and out of shape. I’m losing all my fitness. Argh.

As long as you haven’t just stopped running completely as part of your taper, you will NOT be getting out of shape. While volume should be decreased (and how much you should decrease mileage varies according to what level of runner you are) , you should be keeping up your fast, speed and tempo work if that is the intensity that you are used to.

If you run at a certain pace for your threshold or sessions, continue to do so. Your legs are used to running now and this turnover helps to keep your muscles tuned and primed for the marathon. Don’t be come one of those runners who suddenly feels like they need to sit on the sofa and NOT move.

However, you can be doing ALL of those things and still be feeling like you’ve just eaten the Christmas dinner. This can simply be a result of a drop in mileage for your long runs but that you’re still eating the same as if you’d run that long. It’s normal, don’t sweat it.

Oh my god, running at even my slowest pace feels hard. How am I going to run marathon pace for 26.2 miles?

We’ve ALL felt this one. When you’re one to three weeks out from your marathon goal, which you’ve been training towards for up to 20 weeks, you can still wonder how you’re EVER going to run at the pace you’ve been training for; it can seem impossible, particularly when even your easy runs now feel hard.

Why do they feel hard? I’m of the view that mentally, you spend so long looking forward to the taper, expecting to suddenly feel full of life as if you could race Jessica Ennis that when it doesn’t, it seems extra hard.

However, on race day, if you’ve done your training and completed tempo sessions and long runs with some of it at  marathon pace, the magic just happens. It feels like magic because even 15 minutes after you cross the finish line having achieved your goal, you find yourself wondering how you ever managed to run at the pace you’ve just achieved.

I missed one long training run. Surely it would be better to just do one last long run?

No, it really wouldn’t. Your legs need the chance to recover…hell, mentally you need time to recharge and be prepared for the battle ahead (and marathons are amazing, but be clear, you do need to face a mental battle). Running for the sake of getting that one last run in, is far more likely to leave you exhausted, or worse injured, come marathon day. Stick to the taper plan.

 So, tapering means I can start going out and forget about running for a bit. Hurrah!  

On the flip side, tapering does NOT mean simply sitting on the sofa and scoffing pasta and cake three weeks before the marathon or that you simply can’t run at all. Keeping up the frequency of your runs, even if they are shorter will help prevent you feeling sluggish and getting antsy, particularly when you are so used to the mood boosting hormones that come with running.