GRTW Recipes for Runners: Roasted Butternut Squad and Halloumi Salad with Coconut, Coriander & Chilli Pesto

This is one of those recipes that sounds like a total hassle and like it will take a ton of time. But it’s really quite easy as most of it can be shoved in the oven to roast away and the pesto itself takes minutes if you have a food processor. The pesto is the queen of this dish, it’s amaaaazing and you can use it with anything from fish to roast chicken so it makes a brilliant post-run meal which sorts out your protein recovery fix as well as being damn tasty.



For the pesto

  • 75 g coriander (leaves and stalks)
  • 75g of fresh mint
  • 50 g unsalted roasted cashews
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 long red chilli, roughly chopped (deseeded if you don’t like it too hot)
  • 0.5 lime (juice and finely grated zest)
  • half tin of coconut milk
  • 1 pinch flaked sea salt


  • Cup of cooked couscous
  • Butternut squash, cut into pieces, and roasted in the oven with olive oil, salt and pepper
  • Vine tomatoes,  roasted
  • Asparagus, gently steamed
  • Block of halloumi – cut  into thin slices and dry fry in an un-greased pan, turn when browned

For the pesto, add the chilli, garlic and cashews to the food processor and whizz up. It doesn’t need to be smooth, a little bit of chunkiness from the nuts can be nice. Now add the herbs, and salt and whizz again. Lastly, add enough coconut to combine but for it to keep it’s texture without becoming runny. Taste for seasoning and add fresh lime juice, and more chilli to taste. Serve with the salad.


Race Review: The Moyleman

A weekend of snow and sub-zero temperatures saw road races cancelled all over the UK.  But that didn’t stop this off-road marathon and relay half marathon from taking place on the trails above Lewes ending at Harvey’s Brewery…

One by one, the races due to take part over the weekend fell victim to the snow, ice and windchill and I was expecting – and truth be told, hoping – the same would happen for this off-road trail race that has only been going for the last four years. But it wasn’t cancelled and I’m so glad because this trail race, despite it’s hills and the brutal weather is now firmly on my repeat race list for next year and is definitely a destination race worth travelling for.

The route of the full marathon takes in five high points around the historic county town of Lewes – Black Cap, Kingston Ridge, Firle Beacon and Mount Caburn which command stunning views over the Weald and south to the English Channel, and passes sites association with the Bloomsbury set, including Charleston Farmhouse and Monk’s House in Rodmell.

An excited, if apprehensive crowd of runners greeted me as I went to Race HQ in a local school hall on the outskirts of Lewes; most runners were wrapped up as if about to head out on an Arctic expedition but with good reason, as reports were of 25 mph winds with a wind chill factor of minus 25 and with at least two thirds of the 350 runners taking on the full marathon over tough, hilly terrain, safety was of importance. What’s great about this laid-back friendly event which was set up in memory of local runner, Chris Moyle (a percentage of the race profits go to the nearby Matlet’s Hospice) is that it attracts a mixture of runners from serious club athletes set on racing to recreational runners as well as runners who take part with their dog.

After a quick race brief, a cheer for the marshals we all filed out of the school to a cold, snow covered part of the Downs and fifteen minutes after the marathon runners were set off, the rest of us were off, tracing the footprints in the snow of the runners how had been before. Fearing the windchill, I was triple layered and of course, absolutely baking as I ran up the hill to meet the South Downs Way where the first of the stunning views across the snow covered Downs greeted me. From here, it headed west along the top before dropping down hill where I soon began to pass some of the marathon runners.

Friends had told me about their horrifying training runs on the route a few weeks back when it was thick of gloopy mud and so the cold weather was actually in our favour because it had frozen most of the ground making it easier to run on. A punishing climb back up to the next ridge was rewarded with another swift downhill through the Castle Hill area on the South Downs, past a field full of baby lambs sheltering from the cold near their mothers and into one of the harshest hills on this first half of the route, Swanborough Hill, a long, snaking hill of a chalk path that winds up to the top of the ridge overlooking Lewes. No chance to catch your breath because at the top the route turned into the full force of the wind which at times threatened to push me backwards and freeze my cheeks. Ten minutes further on, an amazing group of marshals were braving the top of the ridge to man a water station, where it was so cold and windy, i threw half of it on me instead of drinking it.

With my Buff pulled up to eye level, I pushed on (after taking a quick picture which nearly saw me lose my fingers to frostbite) eager to run faster just to get off the ridge. A fast downhill via a tarmac laid road which is known as the Yellow Brick road and a turn left, taking us through a valley and out of the wind before the finish line of the first  half of this relay finished at the YHA in Southease , which was packed with supporters and a brilliant place for spectators to watch and for runners to finish with a warm cafe, toilets and even a shower.

Thankfully, my relay partner, Jan, had been dropped off by a partner so while other runners had to wait for a rail replacement bus back to Lewes (thanks Southern Rail!), I was able to pop straight into a warm car and head back to the finish line at Harvey’s Brewery. And what a fantastic finish, over the cobbled stones of Lewes High Street before turning right through the arches straight into Harvey’s Brewery, where you are greeted with a free Moyleman’s glass with a token for a free beer and free food, in this case an individual, handmade hot pizza which was absolutely delicious.

This race may be small, but their organisation in terms of communication in advance of the weather, not to mention the number of marshals they had out on course, was amazing. Every part of the route is brilliantly signposted and every turn staffed by smiling volunteers, despite the freezing conditions.

I’ve finished races all over the world but I think Harvey’s Brewery with a beer and pizza even beats Lake Garda’s prosecco finish. It just needs to be a bit warmer.

This is a tough, brutal course (word from my relay partner, Jan is that she loved it but she had five miles of wind!) but it is absolutely brilliant and not to be missed. It was part of our Girls Run the World Get Together Races for 2018 and will be again for 2019, so what are you waiting for? Join us down South for this one in 2019.


The Good

  • plenty of toilets for the numbers – no queues (hurrah!)
  • amazing marshals
  • best finish line
  • incredible pizza (like, seriously impressive!)

The Bad

  • The windchill but actually, the weather just made this one of those ‘I’ll never forget that race when…’ kind of times…

The Ugly

  • Those hills …although, I kind of like them

For details of next year’s event visit For details of our other Get Together Events for 2018 and Run Away International trips click the links.


GRTW Recipes for Foodie Runners: Cauliflower & black kale coconut curry

Packed with protein this is a satisfying and nutritious dish fcontaining coconut milk which contains vitamins C, E, B1, B3, B5 and B6 and minerals including iron, selenium and sodium, perfect for a post run recovery meal…

Haven’t got all the vegetables you need? Mix and match with what you have in your fridge.

Serves 4

4cm ginger, peeled and chopped

4 garlic cloves

1 fresh green chilli, roughly chopped, seeds removed if you prefer less heat


Olive oil

2 large red onions, chopped

1 tbsp of tomato puree

1 1/2 tsp of ground coriander

1 1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/2 tsp chilli powder

1 cauliflower broken into florets

400ml coconut milk

100g cashew nuts

Two handfuls of black kale, roughly chopped

1/2 tsp garam masala

Fresh coriander, roughly chopped

Fresh lemon

Place the ginger, garlic and chilli into a food processor with the salt and whizz up. Add a little oil to help it become a paste.  Place to one side.

Fry the onions until just turning brown, add the paste and fry for 3 minutes. Next add the tomato puree, all the spices except garam masala and stir to mix.

Add the cauliflower and coat with spices, add the coconut milk and bring to the boil. Turn to simmer, put a lid on and leave to cook.

Meanwhile, heat 1 tbsp of oil in a pan and fly the cashews until golden.

Finally add to the cauliflower along with kale. Sweat down and then add the garam masala. Adjust seasoning and add the coriander and a big squeeze of fresh lemon before serving. You may add water to thin the sauce out.


Adapted from Made in India, by Meera Sodha, Penguin

Marathon Mastery Series: How to avoid an upset tummy

As we approach peak training load for those running Spring marathons, we often hear of runners complaining of an upset stomach and/or feeling sick during and after a run. Read on for advice about how to avoid it….

Run strong without feeling ill
Run strong without feeling ill


For many runners, stomach pain, feeling sick and needing the toilet urgently, are all unfortunate consequences of an increase in marathon training and long training runs. There are a number of factors at play that cause this, but one could be taking on too much carbohydrate in the form of gels.

‘If you take on too many gels or sports energy products, that’s when you get into trouble,’ explains nutritionist Fran Taylor, ‘Your body can only absorb so much sugar and any excess accumulates in the gut and draws in extra water which all contributes to making you feel pretty uncomfortable.’

Research shows that if you want to run faster and keep going, 30-60g of carbohydrates per hour when running for up to two hours (although remember the muscles hold enough fuel for 90 minutes so you won’t need to start taking them until you’ve run for an hour), which equates to about two gels or 8-10 Jelly Babies.  For runs longer than 2 1/2 hours, aim for 90 grammes, about three gels or 16 Jelly Babies.

The above paragraph should also illustrate the benefits of getting used to gels for racing – it takes 20 seconds to swiftly swallow a gel (and we’d recommend doing it fast, they’re not something you want to savour!) compared to trying to chew your way through lots of Jelly Babies.

But there can also be other factors at play when it comes to runners’ gut.


‘When we run for a long time, blood flow to the stomach is reduced in favour of the blood that is powering the muscles to run, and this is  exacerbated by dehydration along with an increase in stress hormones which are released when we exercise, all which can contribute to making you feel sick,’ explains Fran Taylor.

Try to replenish lost fluids when you finish your run and do some yoga stretches (check our YouTube channel for examples) which will help the body to recover and off-set the harmful effects of the stress hormones.


Here’s our guide to what you can eat to fuel your runs…

The Food


Disgusting flavours (Salted Watermelon or Toasted Marshmallow anyone?) aside, gels are easy to swallow and digest, and become available for the body to use as energy almost immediately. But lots of runners avoid them because they taste horrible and this can get confused with people assuming that this is what causes an upset  stomach.

But the reason they cause an upset stomach is usually because someone is taking on too much. Your body can’t use any more than 3 gels in an hour, or 60 grams or less. Then they don’t overload the system and while not tasting great, they’ll do the job.

I can personally vouch for this, I hate gels, hate the taste and the texture, as does almost every runner of every level that I know, BUT shoot them down in one and don’t overdo them and they DO work.  I’m a fan of High 5 Isogels, which are a little bit more liquid than most.

Electrolyte Drinks

If you’re constantly battling an upset stomach and it’s not nerves, switching to liquids may be an alternative. Nowadays, electrolyte mixes from the likes of Tailwind  and Scratch Labs have been specifically designed to fuel the body while moving in the easiest, most digestible form. This can help to a certain degree, but be aware that getting enough carbohydrate in from liquid alone requires drinking a lot. So, it provides an alternative but not without supplementing with another carb source.


Performance blocks like Clif Shot Bloks and Honey Stinger Chews (which are also vegan and use honey as their carb source) are similar to gels but come in a denser form. They provide around seven grammes of carbohydrates at a time, and so this can enable you to test at what point, your body reaches overload and you begin to feel sick.

Longhaul Endurance

These food sachets are increasingly becoming popular with ultra runners, who can’t fuel their runs with gels and sweets because it causes bonking not due to hitting the wall but crashing into a sugar wa (keep feeding the body too much sugar and your sugar levels will spike and then fall, which over a long distance race is not sustainable). They come in flavours such as Turmeric and Chicken and Sweet Potato and Sesame, and provide between 32.6g and 23.7g of carbohydrate respectively. Not easy to take on you’re racing at full pelt but worth investigating for training runs.

Sweet Potatoes

Boil or roast sweet potatoes and you’re left with a creamy, fast-digesting carbohydrate which would work well at the beginning of a race, as long as you take the skin off first which contains fibre and which could cause a tummy upset or require a sudden need to go to the loo.


Pretty much the first thing I can even think of stomaching after a hard run marathon is crisps. They won’t fuel you as well as gels, but they break up the monotony of just eating sweet stuff and contain salt to stabilise your electrolytes and they’re great for afterwards . If you’ve ever watched or taken part in an Ironman event, you’ll see crisps and flat cola on all the refreshment stations on the run.

GRTW Food for Foodie Runners: Spicy Cambodian Inspired Salad

Packed with flavour and spice to fight inflammation and help you recover


This recipe is inspired by the food that I ate while in Cambodia where I was writing about taking part in the Angkor Wat Half Marathon (watch out for our upcoming December 2019 trip) for Run ABC magazine. It’s packed with mint, chilli and all important fresh turmeric which is used in so much of Cambodian food and is particularly renowned for it’s anti-inflammatory properties helping you to recovery quickly – while enjoying LUSH food.



(Serves two)

Fresh turmeric root (available from most Asian supermarkets or health food stores)

1-2 Birds Eye red chillies

Fresh mint and coriander

Kaffir lime leaves (again you can get these frozen in Asian supermarkets)

2 Fresh Limes

Palm Sugar

Thai fish sauce

Rice wine vinegar

Little Gem lettuce, chopped

2 carrots

3 large tomatoes, diced

2 peppers, diced

Dry roasted peanuts


In a pestle and mortar, grind together the chopped up chillies (you may not need two, that’s just me!) with grated turmeric root (1 inch piece is great) and then add fish sauce and rice wine vinegar. Now add palm sugar to taste, along with lime juice. (You’ll have to adjust the seasoning to how you like it but it’s meant to be spicy, sweet and sour – rice wine vinegar will sweeten and the palm sugar helps to take out the fire!).

Now add the peppers, carrot, and chopped tomatoes, and lightly pound with kaffir lime leaves with the dressing. Finally add it to the lettuce and combine well, with plenty of fresh herbs and sprinkle with dry roasted peanuts. You can serve this with pan roasted salmon, a sliced beer, chicken or tofu, whatever takes your fancy.

So, this is not quite as good as Cambodian food eaten on the side of the road at a street food stall (I’ll never forget fish baked in salt crust with a banana leaf salad at a street stall!)  but it’s pretty good!


Marathon Mastery Series: What to do when injury strikes

Injury happens to even the most seasoned of marathon runners, but it doesn’t mean you have to sit on the sofa stewing and panicking about your diminishing fitness and not being able to reach your marathon goal…

The reality is that being injured very rarely means you should totally rest*. Ninety nine percent of the time, it means NOT running but keeping up your running fitness and strength to ensure that once you’ve recovered, you can get back on track to your goal without losing your hard run gains. All you need to do is find the right run replacement (check with your physiotherapist FIRST) and perform it correctly to you stay marathon fit and prevent you from slumping into the doldrums.

Don’t fear weights, they are your friend

Hit the pedals

If you can’t run, spinning or using a turbo trainer is a great way to keep up your running fitness and marathon training. But the cycling must be intense enough to create the same physiological effects as running, or as close to this as possible. Which doesn’t mean cycling serenely to the shops or going on a casual ride.

Emily Proto, a Sussex runner and massage therapist, who recently came third at the Brighton Half marathon explains what she did when she broke her fibula.

‘I broke my fibula during the Brighton Marathon 2015 and had to pull out at the 10k point which was devastating,’ she explains. ‘I’d worked so hard in my marathon training,  I didn’t want to lose my fitness and so I started using a stationary bike with my focus being on keeping my heart rate as high on the bike sessions as i do when I run.

‘I did things like five minutes easy, 10 x 1 minute really hard, with 1 minute easy rest between and a final five minute warm down. It took 30 minutes and I added strength training. I had eight weeks off and it took me only five weeks to get back to fitness afterwards.’

If you don’t have your own turbo at home, try spinning at your local gym or the excellent Sufferfest training available at David Lloyd gyms or MyRide at Virgin gyms or Freedom Leisure.


Cycling is a great way of keeping run fit – if you ride smart. This is me hiding at the back of the shot after the 312 Majorca...that’s the former Tour de France winner, Miguel Induráin


Leap In

So many runners opt to swim when they’re injured, which is a great way to keep the body mobile and stretched. BUT to make it as specific to run fitness, you need to get your heart rate up and that means swim interval sets, just like you do with your running pace work. Try warming up for 100 metres, then do 50 metres at 8/10 effort, 50 metres recovery, x 10. Warm down. If you find swimming boring, this will help to keep it interesting and work your body in a way that’s more consistent with running. Your alternative is to do resistance running in the pool with a buoyancy belt on.

You don’t have to get a wetsuit and all the gear, but you do need to be smart about your training

Row, row, row the boat

Not gently down the stream. Yes, you guessed it, rowing is a fantastic way of keeping up your run fitness and involves all the major muscles of the body (in fact, it could even improve your running arm strength!) but be cautious. As with all of these suggestions, seek the advice of your physiotherapist, BEFORE you decide on which cross training to do. If you have a calf or foot injury, rowing will put a similar pressure through the foot with flexion and extension as you push to row. If it’s OK to row, then this is one al over, heart rate soaring workout. There’s some great suggestions here to keep it interesting.

Ring the bell

Kettle bells are a fantastic way of keeping your strength and cardiovascular fitness for running, particularly transferable physiologically to pace and tempo work. Originally invented in Russia, these metal balls with a handle are swung, with the drive coming from the hips and bottom which helps to build stability and prevent injury in the first place. As the bells swings through the air, your core has to kick in to stabilise the body in the swing trajectory. So, that’s one tick for strength, while all the muscular effort required to drive the correct weighted kettle bell raises your heart rate hugely, tick number two.

If done correctly, with a weight that challenges the body, kettle bells are a fantastic way of keeping up your fitness and don’t take long – a TABATA session of eight rounds of 20 seconds, 10 seconds rest works wonders. We would advise you to get correct tuition in kettle bell swinging before picking it up yourself.



Congratulations to our Runuary Competition winners

During our 2018 Girls Run the World® Runuary Challenge, over 500 women across the globe participated in running a tiny bit every day of January to help boost their own health, fitness and well being and to help inspire and encourage others. We also ran several competitions that were only open to those who registered for the event. Here are the winners – congratulations girls!

There were so many brilliant entries to our prize to win a running jacket and run leggings with Sundried. We asked people to share why they loved running but we thought the best was from Helen Monk, whose instragram picture and reason why she loved running summed it up. Congratulations Helen (or Molly as she is on her IG!)



And we are awarding Fi Thomson a three month subscription to The Protein Ball Co.  for her posts which best sum up the ethos of support, inspiration and motivation through GRTW community, #bettertogether. And quite frankly, because her posts were so damn funny! (And yes, they really did create a Strava route in the shape of boobs!)

Five Simple Tips for Staying Calm on Race Day

Do you find all your best laid race plans go to pot because you panic on race day? Here’s our guide about how to stay calm from the night before the race right the way to the finish line…



  • Go out
    You may feel like you want to be alone the day before your race, but socialising could work as a distraction, helping you relax and disengage from the pre-race nerves. An early dinner or film with friends or family could be the perfect solution.
  • Write your own confidence story, recommends sports psychologist, Josephine Perry, Performance in Mind.  Split a piece of paper into two columns, write your goal for the race on the top left, and your mantra on the right. At the bottom left, write your strengths, which you can take from all the training runs that went really well, while on the righthand side, write down three sessions that you did in training where you felt you could nail your goal. ‘It works to remind you of all the training that you’ve done where you have achieved your goals and will help to calm your anxiety by boosting your confidence,’ she explains. 
  • Get prepared the night before  It sounds obvious, and it is. But how many times have your found yourself running around the morning of a race looking for your socks or your safety pins? ‘Lay out your kit, pin on your race number, fasten your chip, prepare your breakfast, plan your journey,’ advises GRTW running coach, Tara Shanahan. ‘Then try and relax, listen to some soothing music, read a book, anything to distract you from thinking about the race.’
  • Take a deep breath – Anxiety tenses your muscles and shortens your breathing, limiting the amount of oxygen available for your brain to think clearly. ‘Find a quiet place and focus on your plan, your mantras, all the stuff that has got you through to this day,’ advises GRTW running coach, Tara Shanahan. ‘Remember, it’s just running, something that you’re doing because you love it; think of the race as the ultimate opportunity, time to do all the things that you’ve done so well in the lead up.’
  • Have a mantra – smile with the miles  ‘In every Ironman I’ve ever done, I’ve wanted to quit,’ says Ironman champion, Chrissie Wellington. ‘That little voice in one ear that says, ‘pull to the side, it’s not going to be your day,’ but I’ve pushed through repeating my mantra, Never Ever Give Up and smile. You’re only as powerful as your mind.’

GRTW Podcast; ‘I ran the Marathon Des Sables to prove everyone wrong’

Devinder Bains, now 39, was a magazine features editor on a busy weekly magazine, more used to press launches and cocktail bars than running through the Sahara Desert without showering for a week. But that didn’t stop her taking on the Marathon Des Sables, an arduous six day multi-stage race of over 155 miles on just 12 weeks training that has a tiny 14% female entry level.

You can listen to how Hot Yoga and Welsh mountains helped Devinder train,and how she managed to eat the 5000 required calories despite not eating meat. http://Listen to Devinder’s podcast here

After the MDS, Devinder went on to become the editor of Grazia, Dubai before setting up a personal training company, FitSquadDxB and a content agency, The Content Collective



Since then, Devinder went on to become the editor of Grazia, Dubai and now runs her own successful personal training company, FitSquadDXB and content agency, The Content Collective.


Fancy entering the Marathon Des Sables? They now have one in the Sahara, Peru and a half distance in Fueterventura. For more details click here.


How to stay motivated to run

Whatever your goal, to complete GRTW Runuary, to train for a marathon to reach your first 5km, read these tips from these four inspiring, every day female runners who took part in GRTW Runnual – to run every day of the year – in 2017…


Hildi Mitchell, 47, teacher 
Why did you decide to do it? 
It was New Year’s Day when my friend, Emma told me about Girls Run the World Runuary 2017. I’d been ill all holiday and was feeling despondent but she persuaded me that it would be a great way to get back to running (I’d had to take 2 months out of my training for Brighton marathon due to injury and illness), on top of which we were at La Santa, it was sunny and there was a running track on my door step. By February, I was loving the challenge and decided to carry on.
I almost gave up when…never although there were hard days when I was ill and super busy. I had to run on a morning of my sister’s wedding after a gruelling two day interview, and  once at 5am in the morning before packing all the kids suitcases to dash to the airport to fly home from holiday. Only once did I nearly not run and that was in January when I went out in my pyjamas, coat and wellies to walk the dog because I wasn’t feeling the running vibe. Then I thought,  ‘What the hell!’ and ran a kilometre holding my hands over my boobs because I wasn’t wearing a running bra! It was then I realised I’d probably been making too much fuss about the effort required in ‘going for a run’ in the past.
The biggest surprise was…that I didn’t get injured because I learned to listen to my body in new ways. I adjusted my route, distance and time of day to reduce grumbles. Plus I got a 5km PB after five years, which I think came from the discipline of running every day.
My friends and family …were really supportive although my husband thought I’d get injured or make myself seriously ill. I did most of my runs with my cockerpoo, Pippin, but it also meant I ran with my sister and my daughter who did her first park run with me. We all ended up running the Edinburgh marathon relay with my daughter doing the final leg which was really special.
The best thing… about it has been all the amazing sunrises and sunsets, and the experience of the changing seasons, the light, the weather and the world around me, a special gift which I’ll never forget.
If you’re considering doing it in 2018 here’s my three best tips…
1. Commit to a minimum distance and route: it’s 1 km from my door, round the half of the field over the road that is lit by street lights, and back again. That was my go to run on bad or busy days – and it doubled as a quick dog walk too.
2. Stop washing your hair after every run. Anything you can do to reduce the time it takes means it’s more likely it will happen. Get some dry shampoo and an attitude instead.
3. Get another challenge ready for After You Finish. You’ll be setting yourself the expectation that you WILL do this, but you’ll also have something ready to keep you motivated once you’ve achieved it. I’ve signed up for a 12 mile relay swim – better get in back in the pool!

Ruth Farnell, 56 IT Project Manager

Why did you decide to do it?

I didn’t I just found myself carrying on after runuary. After a few months, people started asking me “when are you going to stop” and I had to have an answer so I said “after a year”

I almost gave up when…. I got back from a  long day at work and had to go out for a short run at 11.30pm. I’ll be forever grateful to my partner for sticking my trainers on and pushing me out the door because he knew the streak was very important to me.

The biggest surprise was… finding some beautiful running routes in parts of the country and in cities where you would least expect to and the joy of running in the rain.

My friends and family…were really supportive, my four adult kids are really proud of my running in general but particularly with runnual and completing my first 2 marathons. My partner has thought me barking mad but has also been quietly very supportive.

The best thing about it has been…

1. Meeting lots of new people, especially Anne-Marie D,  a quiet dignified lady who let me share her runs in a beautiful part of  Belgium, South of Brussels who i met through GRTW Runuary.

2. The sunrises, which set me up for my day and helped get everything into perspective.  We are tiny specs in the universe with such a short time on the planet so enjoy your running and as many sunrises as possible.
3. introducing me to a community that stretches across generations and brings you together with people you wouldn’t normally meet.
If you’re considering doing it in 2018, here’s my three best tips…
1.  Use the internet and find out where people run in places you might be visiting.
2. Plan when you are going to run and do not be put off by the weather – get out there at the time you said.

3.  Keep kit at work so you can nip out at lunch time if possible and to generally give you some flexibility.

Runuary has changed my running – or me – …..I’ve have developed muscles running 1300 miles this year – little and often suits me and all my times have improved and I’m much braver. Statistically women are relatively safe going out at night (women are more likely to be attacked in their own home). I’ve run places I wouldn’t have considered before and found them perfectly OK. I have also dealt with my phobia of big dogs.

Jenny, 46, project officer

Why did you decide to do it?

I split up with my husband in autumn 2016 and was looking for a new challenge to kickstart my health. Being part of Girls Run the World Runuary gave me a good reason to get out of the house every day, to run off some of the stressful emotions and to have a little time focusing on me.


I almost gave up …. on day 282, it was October, the days were getting shorter and I was working on a deadline at work so time was limited. The year was a long way in and I was feeling tired and it just felt pointless to run a joyless 1mile but fortunately my kids pushed me out the door and I’m glad I went.

The biggest surprise was… how much of a difference running every day has made. I no longer negotiate about whether I’m going to run, I just find the time slot each day that will be most convenient.

My friends and family …have all been very encouraging.

The best thing about it has been…the stress-relief, just one mile per day and the fun of discovering new places and sights to enjoy.

If you’re considering doing it in 2018, here’s my three best tips…

1. embrace those 1-mile runs – they are basically a rest day and help you stay injury-free and stop the injury risk of increasing your mileage too quickly

2. Find new timeslots in your week to run (I now run in the 30 minutes between dropping off and picking up my daughter from her flute lesson; also I drive past a park on my way home from work so once a week or  I change into my running gear and get in a couple of miles before I get home.
3. I’m now a massive fan of taking running pics. They’ve helped distract me from thinking about the actual running and it has been really useful to look out for new/interesting/photo-worthy things, particularly on those local 1-mile runs that would have become very monotonous otherwise.
Runuary has changed my running – running every day means that each run matters less, so when you have one of those runs where you feel like a tortoise trudging through treacle happen, I don’t worry about it any more. Tomorrow is another day and will be different.


Wendy Davidson, Administrative exectutive 

Why did you decide to try and run all year? I’d had a terrible 2016 and the idea of runnual inspired me. I thought that running was unlikely to make me feel worse, and would probably help.

I almost gave up when…. Believe it or not, apart from the odd day when I thought “Oh no I’ve got to run”, I never thought of giving up. I’ve run in rain, snow, ice, with hangovers, once I make my mind up I rarely give up.

The biggest surprise was… how much I enjoyed it and how much better it made me feel, so quickly.

My friends and family thought …I was crazy but they were really supportive.

The best thing about it has been…running with some lovely people, especially my partner in crime, Liz Shand, who was the one who suggested we do runuary and who also did runual. We’ve both lost our mojos at different times but we’ve been able to get the other one back into it We only run together 2-3 times per month but following each other on Strava has given us that support.

Runuary has changed my running – in that now I enjoy it, so much that sometimes I’d go out and run twice. IT’s also made me a much happier person and stopped me spiralling into depression. It’s lifted me further up than I’ve been in a very long time.