Review: Hoka One One Torrent

If you’re looking for a great trail shoe to get you through your training to the Spring, then look no further…

Features

  • Open engineered mesh construction
  • PROFLY midsole
  • Multidirectional lugs
  • Protective outlays
  • Weight: 254g (size EU 42)
  • Forefoot height: 18mm
  • Heel height: 23mm
  • Drop: 5mm
  • Colourways: Lichen/seaport, sodalite blue/very berry, nine iron/steel grey (wouldn’t you love the job of coming up with the colour way descriptions?!)
  • Price: Online prices range from approximately £55

At Girls Run the World, we’ve always been fans of the Salomon Speedcross but on our recent training camp to Ethiopia in November, which saw us taking our runners out into the eucalyptus forests and trails around Addis Ababa, we tested out the Hoka One One, Torrent.

Created as a trail racer, it is lightweight helping you to stay agile while also boasting cushioning, which is useful for long, steep downhills. Plus, unlike many trail shoes, it offers enough traction to make you feel sure of your footing on rocky and muddy trails alike, without being so pronounced that running on anything else feels uncomfortable.

And yes, we appreciate that not everyone gets the opportunity to run in Ethiopia (although, you can you know…join us this November for our next training week), but the Torrent is also great on the muddy trails of the UK too.

 

Rating

Style: ****

They look a tiny bit clunky, even though they are lightweight. But then, that is a characteristic of Hoka One One shoes.

Performance ****

Best suited to those who need some cushioning comfort when they run. If you’re a mountain goat, these may feel a little bit constrictive.

Terrain: *****

A great all rounder, as great on rocky trails as the red earth of Ethiopia and the very muddy trails of the UK countryside in the winter.

 

Introducing our #grtwproject26.2 runners

At the end of 2018, we ran a competition to win a virtual marathon training package with us. These are the four women who won and who will be sharing their marathon training journey with the GRTW community over the next four months…

 

Kerrie Flippance, 43, legal executive and mum of three, Warwickshire 

Instagram: @kerrie.runs.26.2

Goal race: Manchester Marathon

Target finish: 3 hours, 50 minutes

Why Kerrie applied: Support in juggling training with being a mum of three

It’s my first marathon and I so I’d love some help and support to know what to do and how to train, particularly around my job and juggling family life.

This will be my first marathon. I am scared but excited. I am worried about hitting the wall, about being away from my family for far too long whilst training and also whether I actually get to cross the finish line without being taken away in an ambulance. I also thought these things for my first half and now it’s my favourite distance.

My dream goal would be to one day get a good for age for London.  I want to do something for myself but hope that this will also inspire my children.

Current PBs

  • 5km 22.12
  • 10km 49:02. 
  • Half Marathon1:49:01

Marie Knight, 40, export manager wine industry from Brighton 

Instagram: @wightyknighty

Goal Race: Brighton Marathon

Target time: 4  hours, 35 minutes

Why Marie applied:

I have a busy work schedule that involves travel and time away from home so I need help with a flexible training plan, that will offer support when things change at the last minute! My previous training plans for half marathons have fallen down when I’ve become ill and slipped behind and lost confidence.

I have always said I would never run a marathon and I now find myself 16 weeks away from race day. It honestly still feels like something I could never do despite having watched so many fantastic runners of all different levels complete the Brighton marathon this year. I’m genuinely terrified and that in turn makes me even more determined to train properly, complete the 26.2 miles and enjoy every moment! I was also asked by a friend of mine to join in fundraising for their 3 yr old daughter who needs a life changing operation to give her the chance to walk. Little Ufi was born 3 months premature and suffered severe brain injuries which mean she cannot walk amongst various other learning disabilities. There’s a little girl determined to walk, and it feels like there is no good reason for me not to show the same determination to complete a marathon to give her the chance to walk. 2019 is the 10-year anniversary of the Brighton Marathon and having started running in 2016, I would be super proud to be running my first marathon in my home town. Running has been an important part of settling into a new life in Brighton, making new friends with an amazing and inspiration group of women of all ages and fitness. I’ve been lucky enough to run with the GRTW runners at a huge variety of events and always been encouraged to give everything my best shot and supported even when I was one of the last runners the finish line. It would be great to start 2019 with a clear and focused ‘end in mind’ plan to get me to the point of crossing the finish line feeling strong, happy and knowing that I’d raised money for a fantastic cause.

Obstacles: Work travel often puts pressure on ability to train / run as I planned. Usually week days with tempo / speed sessions but occasional weekends which then impacts long slow runs. Previously with half marathon training I’ve struggled to ensure strength training happens as well as the running part of the plan.

Strength – enjoy speed work / tempo sessions. Weakness – technique on hills, overstriding, can talk myself out of a long run when on my own.

Personal Bests

  • 5km, 27.38
  • 10km, 1:00:43
  • Half Marathon, 2:12:45

Catriona Ward Sell, 31, a soldier in the British Army, Ipswich  

Instagram: @_thiscatcan_

Goal Race: London Marathon

 

Target time: 3 hours, 17 minutes

Why she applied: Wants to get faster

 

I started running more seriously last year, and improved quickly with a 19:18 5km, 40:28 10km and 1:29:15 half marathon. Now, I’ve stalled and I don’t know how to progress.

Also, I wanted to be part of a female running community as only 9% of women in the Army are female. I can give the guys a run for their money, but ultimately their training styles, intensity and routine is different to my own. They don’t understand what it’s like to have short legs and a faster cadence, nor do they understand certain monthly cycles that we females have to deal with.

Personal bests

  • 5km, 19.18  
  • 10km, 40:28
  • Half Marathon, 1:29:15

 

Rachel Sparkhall, sales and marketing manager, 43, Bedfordshire 

 

Instagram: @rachel.sparkhall

Goal race: Paris Marathon

Target: 3 hours, 59 minutes

Why she applied: How to juggle training with work and migraines

‘Running my first ever marathon and would like to do really well, but I suffer from migraines and juggling work commitments so need  guidance to get me there.’

I enjoy it but it has also really helped with my general well being, having suffered with chronic migraine for +20 years. Exercise helps to keep them under control.

Recent PBs

10km, 49 mins

Half Marathon, 1.47.48

 

These women will all be sharing their trials and tribulations with us via their Instagram channels and via our blog once per month. 

If you are interested in receiving virutal marathon training with us, please get in touch. Rachel and Cat are being coached by Tara Shanahan and Kerrie and Marie by GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston.

 

Project 26.2 – who will win our marathon training package?

In November, we launched #project26.2, which is going to provide four lucky women with the chance to win virtual marathon training and mentorship with GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston and head Brighton coach Tara Shanahan. Between them, they’ve run around 15 marathons and have seen their times drop to just under 3 hours 16 minute. 

We thought we’d share some of the entries out of the hundreds that we’ve received so far. There’s still time for YOU to apply yourself though. Entries close 17th December. To read about the terms and conditions and to enter, click here

 

 

Mona Sorenson, mum of two

Mona, is an experienced runner but with two young children, finds it hard to devote the time or headspace to achieving what she would like in marathon running.

Being a busy working mum especially means I don’t really have the luxury of time needed to really coach myself or take myself to the next level.’

 

For Rachel, it will be her first time running a marathon; ‘A marathon is my ultimate running goal and my best chance of achieving it is by committing to working with a coach to train for it. I’ve only been running regularly for three years, but if I were to win this competition I would learn what I am capable of.’

Judith: I’ve got a charity place to run London for MyelomaUK, a charity close to my heart as I have Myeloma and AL Amyloidosis.

I’m in remission at the moment. I’ve been building up my running over the past year and completed a trail marathon in the summer. Running on roads isn’t my thing so I’ll need a lot of support and advice to help me complete London in a time and way that will make all my sponsors proud.’

 

The hardest thing about running a marathon is not the race, but navigating the training and that’s where we step in with our silver and gold service packages. We write your plans personalised to YOU, taking into consideration not just your running background but what’s going on in your life too. After all, what’s the point of following a 70 mile per week training plan when you’re juggling work, family and relationships? Running should reward and challenge, not punish and add to your stress levels.

 

 

Why strength training can transform your running

If you want to avoid injury, improve your running form and progress your running fast, the missing magic ingredient is strength training

Strength training which works for women
(copyright Girls Run the World)

Over the last ten years, I’ve coached hundreds of female runners from beginners right the way through to sub 3 hour 30 minute marathon runners – and the one thing that stands out as making the biggest difference to improved running is strength training.

To help the women we coach understand how vital it is to improved running, I like to use the analogy of ball that is pumped up and one that is slightly flat; the pumped up one bounces up high off the floor, the flat one can not lift off the floor or does so poorly.  That’s the difference that a conditioned muscle makes to your running form compared to a running body that has not been conditioned.

How strength training helps you as a runner…

  1. You’ll be able to keep running consistently without having to take time off for injury
  2. It improves your running economy by up to 8%, making you more efficient which means less tired and faster
  3. Improves your ability to create force – exactly what you need to be able to do in order to drive your body off the floor and land with every stride
  4. Improves your V02 max by up to 4%, which is a measure of your aerobic capacity

All of this matters hugely if you’re training for endurance, whether that’s a half marathon, marathon, triathlon, or ultra.

If you take one thing from this post, it is this – in  Sieler’s Hierarch of Endurance Training needs, which ranks eight fundamental training practices in order of proven impact, the fundamental foundation of training is volume – if you become injured because your body is not strong enough, that volume and consistency is undermined.

 

I recently spoke with Chrissie Wellington at the Training Peaks Endurance Coaching Summit and she spoke about her amazing London Marathon time of 2 hours 44 minutes and she credits strength work as the secret to her success;

‘I magnate to do it off the back of strength and conditioning, which meant that I stayed strong off the back of the end of the marathon which becomes even more important as we age.’

How do I fit it in?

All this is all very well and good, I hear you say, but how do I fit in marathon training, relationship, work and family?

This, and lack of understanding about strength training and how to do it are the single biggest reasons that female runner neglect strength training. But it doesn’t need to take long – 10-20 minutes of the RIGHT strength training will help transform you as a runner, much more than just slogging out the same miles at the same pace over and over again.

To help women who are training for endurance to get that secret ingredient into the running or triathlon mix, we have created a four week strength training programme, encompassing three workouts per week of approximately 20 minutes. Each workout is different and is delivered via our membership portal to your phone, and all the exercises are filmed so you’ll know exactly what to to do and how. You must have access to a gym.

It costs £29.99 and once purchased you’ll own it for life and will be able to repeat the programme whenever you like, whether you want to build strength for an endurance event or you just want to do it in order to get fit and in shape.

It will be available to purchase in December, perfect timing for anyone who is doing a Spring marathon helping you to lay the foundations upon which your volume of training can build.

We’ll be offering limited special offer deals for the first 20 to purchase the programme and these special codes will only be delivered via our newsletter. To sign up, click here. 

Launching #grtwproject26.2

Have you got a Spring marathon lined up next year? Read on to find out how to you could WIN our silver service training package worth £480 for  as part of #grtwproject26.2 2019…

With our training service, it will feel like you’ve got someone running and guiding you at all times

 

Signing up for a marathon is exciting, whether it’s your first or your fiftieth time of running 26.2 miles. But juggling training, family, relationship, work and lifestyle commitments can derail even the most enthusiastic and committed runner amongst us.

Which is why we have created our one to one virtual silver coaching package, which provides you with personalised training plans written for YOU by one of our team of qualified and experienced running, yoga and strength and conditioning coaches, including GRTW founder, Rachael Woolston and head coach, Tara Shanahan. Plus, god forbid anything goes wrong, co-founder and qualified physiotherapist will provide the support to help you get back to training.

We write a plan that fits YOUR lifestyle, your goals and your running background and experience.

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced runner who would like to achieve a personal best, we’ll deliver your training via our software partners, Training Peaks, one of the world’s best training software packages,  with your progress reviewed weekly and a monthly coaching call via Skype, telephone or email.

Training plans and workouts delivered direct to your phone with email reminders

We don’t just help you with your running, but your mental approach, nutrition, stretching, strength and more, enabling you to train without the stress and anxiety of being unsure of what you’re doing or how you can fit it in. Plus, if something goes wrong – illness, injury or a holiday and your training is derailed, our plans change to accommodate this and get you back on track.

So, no stress, no injury causing you to crash out of your A race, and progress that you can measure and see to help you build your confidence day by day, ready for race day.

To launch our silver service, we are now offering FOUR women the chance to win our mentoring service taking you from January right the way through to your Spring marathon race day.

In order to be in with a chance of winning our special #grtwproject26.2 2019, worth £480, enter below and like our Facebook or Instagram channel, where we will be sharing stories of our entrants and inviting votes from our community. ENTRIES CLOSE 17TH DECEMBER 2018.

 

 

ENTER #GRTWPROJECT26.2 HERE

 

 

Terms and Conditions 

  • Only open to women 18 or over
  • You will need write a short weekly post for our blog, detailing your training to help inspire and motivate others – even when training is NOT going right
  • You can be any level, beginner or experienced
  • If you are currently injured and unlikely to be able to start training in December, please do not enter
  • The judges decision about the winners is final
  • Training will start in January
  • You must be able to commit to doing a minimum of four training runs per week
  • You will need to have a Garmin training watch
  • Training Peaks Premium account is not included

 

 

 

How was your weekend running?

As the clocks went back this weekend, the wintry temperatures moved in but there was still lots of great racing around the UK…

Top of the races on the South Coast it seems, was the Beachy Head Marathon and 10km, which starts in Eastbourne. We had lots of runners from the community taking part in one or other of the distances. If you’ve not heard of this race, look it up for next year (Oct 26, 2019) because it is a stunning route (particularly the longer marathon route) which takes in the beauty of the South Downs National Park in the Autumn.

Picture: Jo Prior

Renowned for spectacular scenery, steep ascents, punishing descents and a fantastic friendly atmosphere (even a music band and a tabletop  of currant buns and sugary tea at some of the refreshment stops), this is a fantastic bucket-list event. Or you can use it as training for an ultra.

In, fact, we were  on a 50 mile bike ride the following day with the third placed women’s marathon finisher, Bethan Male, who got to the podium with a time of 3 hrs, 21 minutes and was using the event as training for an ultra race in about a month’s time which involves a double – almost-ascent of Pen Y Fan!

As the clocks go back, this was the weekend that saw the launch into the night trail races, with Maverick Silva Dark Series in  West Sussex (try their Surrey one on 10th November if you’re in the South). But  our favourite of the weekend was definitely an event that one of our Scottish GRTW contingent ran this weekend, the Illuminator Night Trail Race, a 15  mile route with four big ‘ole climbs, lit by your head torch only. Well done all those who ran it, it looks beautiful and tough.

Which brings us to another race that we  missed mentioning last weekend when we missed our regular debrief, The Dramathon, which offers a marathon, a half or a 10km, with the full route tracking the Speyside Way from Glenfaricas Distillery to Glenfiddich and ending, of course with a dram.

Scotland, we salute you! Definitely winning hands down on the variety of the races offered, both in terms of challenging terrain and exploring!

 

 

How was your weekend running?

There were some big hitters in this weekend’s races, such as the Chicago and Chester Marathon. But what caught our eye was an event that helps put on the agenda the question of how much waste is produced by running events… 

So, Mo Farah won the Chicago Marathon this weekend in a time of 2 hours, 5 minutes and 11 seconds, his first marathon win. Meanwhile, on European shores, the Chester Marathon took place. This is an event where age group recreational athletes are invited by English Athletics to compete for their country. If you think there is no way you could ever represent your country, it is worth taking a look at the qualifying criteria and applying if you are interested because it IS possible.  For more details, click here.

(By the same token, if you have your heart set on running the London marathon, or any of the other Majors, it is worth looking at the qualifying times you’d need to get for your age. You have to be in it, to win it as the saying goes and our virtual marathon training can help you get there).

Elsewhere in the UK, our core GRTW team were also taking part in events. Tara Shanahan, our Brighton and Hove Co-ordinator took fourth woman at the Bright10, a ten mile flat road race in Brighton in a time of one hour, 2 minutes and 37 seconds while co-founder, Dawn Buoys took on the Downlink 38 mile ultra. Elsewhere, we had lots of runners at the Oxford Half marathon – well done!

But it was an event run by one of our community, the Penicuik House Trail 10km, a new race that takes place in the grounds of Penicuik Estate in Midlothian, Scotland that caught our attention. Obviously, a beautiful part of the world to run in Autumn but it was the medals that caught our eye, made of wood that had from the Estate while the the first lady and man home received hand carved bowls from trees from the estate.

At at time when so much is being written about the waste in the fashion industry, perhaps it’s also time to turn our attention to running races. How many plastic bags are given out at a race finish, often containing lots of useless items including at least three printed leaflets. Then there are the t-shirst? How many of us really wear them again?

So, we applaud any event that introduces a way to prevent the waste of materials and plastic.  And if you’re interested in this subject, do check out the community interest company, Re-Run. Set up by ultra runner Dan Lawson and his wife, Charlotte, they are prolonging the life of running kit by re-purposing old race medals or event t-shirts to make new items which they are selling and using the profits to go back into supporting running projects.

How was your weekend running?

As we officially hit Autumn, the running season is hotting up with road and trail races taking place all over the UK this last weekend. Not least the Maverick Inov-8 X series Snowdonia 2018,  the first of our UK wide GRTW Get Together Events

From 3,145 feet on the shortest route to 4,055 feet on the middle route and up to 6,277 feet, the Maverick inov-8 X series Snowdonia race offers three distances, 17km, 23km or 43km but all three require a different approach than any usual road – or even trail – race because this is the mountains. And they take no prisoners!

We had 20 runners taking part, across all distances and everyone set off together up the Llanberis path  towards the summit of Snowdon with most runners adopting a fast hiking method before the tarmac even ran out.

My approach was to run everything I could, and if it became so steep that running became ineffective, to hike as quickly as I could. It wasn’t long after the tarmac section that I joined everyone else in walking. Lots of runners had set off with collapsible poles and, having not done any mountain races before, it was interesting to note the way runners used them, swinging them forward and using the swing of the pole to almost glide forward up the hill. (If you want some tips on techniques for running up or down technical terrain, listen to our YouTube interview with the women of this year’s marathon winner, in a time of five hours and 1 minute, Julia Davis by clicking here).

We could not have had better weather as we climbed up and up, the sound of everyone’s heavy breath joined by the huff and puff of the Snowdon train, a plume of smoke trailing behind it, as it chugged up with the many passengers who must have been surprised to find the trails full of up to 500 numbered runners.

As we climbed, the weather got colder and windier, so it was time to stop and put on a jacket, buff and gloves, which was at just about the point that the 17km route turns to descend again (not quite making the summit, which disappointed some of our runners) while the middle route continued up to the top and then it was a thrillingly, hairy descent (near the top, the marathon route also veers off to follow a separate route) to the refreshment table at the bottom.

After a big ascent and then trying to jump from rock to rock, my thighs were like jelly, and I certainly did not look like the couple who had climbed next to me and then disappeared down the trail, literally dancing amongst the jagged rocks, seemingly oblivious to the tiny narrow spaces where you had to place your foot.

By the time I hit the refreshment table, I was very glad of the coke, salted crackers, potatoes and cola bottles that were on offer, all which went in, in one handful. A short road section on the level was soon followed by another ascent along a zig zag path and then finally, a runnable trail path back to the race finish.

This was the first of our UK wide Get Together races, where we invite runners from around the UK to join us at an event, which we choose based on it offering a challenge but in an inspiring location – we provide the training plan, you train and meet us there. So well done Kate Dolphin from Malvern who joined us there and took on the mighty marathon and her sister, Lily Price.

 

 

Elsewhere in the UK, there was also lots of other events going on including the Windsor Half Marathon , a two lap, undulating race that takes place with Windsor Castle as a backdrop. Well done to Jenny Hall, who ran.

There was also Barnes Green Half Marathon, a road half marathon, renowned for fast times and for attracting lots of club runners. It’s definitely one for the calendar if you’re looking for a good one to train for next September. Although if you’re looking for the perfect Autumnal run for next year…one of our runners took on the Forest of Dean Half Marathon.  She reported that it was full of trees ablaze with the colours of the season.

So, well done to all of you who ran this weekend. If you’re interested in our Get Together races in 2019, sign up to our newsletter (visit the main page of our website) as we are just finalising the events and will attempt to organise discounts with the event organisers. 

Did you PB this weekend, run somewhere amazing that other women would love to hear about? Comment below and share your news.

 

 

 

 

How was your weekend running?

The weather over the weekend for the South coast led to a string of event cancellations but up in Scotland and elsewhere it was a different story…

Pic: Baxter’s Loch Ness Marathon

A sparse weekend it seems for events, but the big one that lots of our community took part in was the Baxter’s Loch Ness Marathon and 10km, which looked glorious. Did you run it? It’s definitely one for our bucket list both for the beauty and for the fact that the first half is almost all downhill! Check out that route profile.

 

Even further up the UK, the weather was even more glorious with blue skies at the Tufty Trail, an off road event in Fife that takes place in the Scottish estate of the Falkland Estate. A five mile woodland trail race,, this one is a flat one and looks beautiful.

But while the weather looked great up in those parts, in our neck of the woods – or beach and Downs, it was a damp squib.

Rain, rain and more rain, heralded the arrival of Autumn with a big bucket of a soaking. More formal racing was taking place at SEAA Road Relays at Crystal Place where our Brighton and Hove Coach Co-ordinator, Tara was racing. A team relay event, it’s a fast paced competitive event but fun too.

But what the weekend weather did help remind us of is the need for good kit.

Despite having been a runner in all weathers since the year 2000, it’s amazing how quickly you forget over the summer the kit that you MUST have to make your running in the winter enjoyable.

If you want to see what our community members think are the best waterproof jackets, join our Facebook community and look under Topics, Kit.

 

How to thrive, not just survive a Ragnar Relay

Want to know the best way to approach a multi-stage team relay event? GRTW Co-owner, Dawn Buoys reveals all …

A few months ago I got a call from my friend Tom asking if I fancied taking part in a relay team for Ragnar in Hamburg. Our last event in 2013 had been in San Francisco, where I’d run over the Golden Gate Bridge so, to be honest, the box was pretty much ticked with bells on. But since I’m currently training for a 38 mile ultra event, I thought at least it would be a good training weekend.

I didn’t realise I’d totally missed the point.

You see, Ragnar is not really about running, it’s about everything else that goes with it; it’s an adventure with your friends where you get really tired, probably lost, and go a bit feral. And if you get the right team, you spend most of the time struggling to speak not because you’re out of breath due to running but from laughing so much.

To get the most out of the weekend it’s all in the planning. Think about how best you can look after everyone on the team so that they can enjoy their experience. Our team leader knows what he’s doing so he matched each relay legs to each individual’s running ability based on distance (each relay leg can vary in distance), running experience and who would be best to run in certain areas in the dark. For instance, some of the relay legs are van supported and so, while they can be a bit longer, suit runners who prefer the security of a van nearby.

Sorting out a buddy system over night so that everyone has company when they need it is also vital – and most importantly, get an extra, non running person to drive.

Needless to say, in Hamburg we had no driver so were doing it all ourselves which unfortunately meant a few mess ups, like turning up at the wrong checkpoints at the wrong time. It meant one of our runners, Will was left stranded at the end of his leg but he fortunately made friends had eaten chips and got chatted up while he was waiting for us.

Also, keep the van tidy – I can be terribly messy but it’s exhausting if you can’t find what you need when you need it, especially at night. We kept a food, drink and lie down section at the back of the van, wipes, loo roll, bin bags in the passenger door and all the high viz and lights in the driver’s door. On that note, any extra head torches, or lights of any kind are super useful at night.

As a physiotherapist, I’d also recommend you try and keep moving. Once it gets cold at night it’s really tempting to hibernate in the van but your legs will stiffen quickly. Get out, walk around, support the others runners and do a few stretches; your legs will really appreciate your efforts.  And eat!

Realistically, sleeping is unlikely so keep fuelling your body so it can keep going. Try and rest but don’t be upset if sleep doesn’t happen, your adrenaline will be pumping and it’s hard to totally switch off. Even if the day is warm you will get cold, I thought I had over packed in Hamburg but was so grateful for all my extra layers and especially my beanie hat and waterproof.

But most important of all, bring the right attitude. We vowed to never mention if we were cold or tired, as it’s pointless. That’s the challenge and that’s the bit that makes it worthwhile.

There are big highs and big lows often in the same mile. I was running through a cabbage field at three am panicking that it looked like an episode of Wallander when suddenly the clouds cleared, a huge moon appeared and shone so brightly that I found myself singing my heart out to Razorlight feeling like the luckiest girl in the world to be there.

So am I pleased I went to Hamburg? Of course. Was it better than San Fran? Actually it was, because I made some amazing new friends, had the biggest adventure and enjoyed so many belly laughs and that’s what a Ragnar is all about!